Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/1100242
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dc.contributor.authorMAGNUSSON, W. E.
dc.contributor.authorGRELLE, C. E. V.
dc.contributor.authorMARQUES, M. C. M.
dc.contributor.authorROCHA, C. F. D.
dc.contributor.authorDIAS, B.
dc.contributor.authorFONTANA, C. S.
dc.contributor.authorBERGALLO, H.
dc.contributor.authorOVERBECK, G. E.
dc.contributor.authorVALE, M. M.
dc.contributor.authorTOMAS, W. M.
dc.contributor.authorCERQUEIRA, R.
dc.contributor.authorCOLLEVATTI, R.
dc.contributor.authorPILLAR, V. D.
dc.contributor.authorMALABARBA, L. R.
dc.contributor.authorLINS-E-SILVA, A. C.
dc.contributor.authorNECKEL-OLIVEIRA, S.
dc.contributor.authorMARTINELLI, B.
dc.contributor.authorAKAMA, A.
dc.contributor.authorRODRIGUES, D.
dc.contributor.authorSILVEIRA, L. F.
dc.contributor.authorSCARIOT, A. O.
dc.contributor.authorFERNANDES, G. W.
dc.contributor.otherWILLIAM E. MAGNUSSON, INPA; CARLOS E. V. GRELLE, UFRJ; MÁRCIA C. M. MARQUES, UFPR; CARLOS F. D. ROCHA, UERJ; BRAULIO DIAS, UnB; CARLA S. FONTANA, PUCRS; HELENA BERGALLO, UERJ; GERHARD E. OVERBECK, UFRGS; MARIANA M. VALE, UFRJ; WALFRIDO MORAES TOMAS, CPAP; RUI CERQUEIRA, UFRJ; ROSANE COLLEVATTI, UFG; VALÉRIO D. PILLAR, UFRGS; LUIZ R. MALABARBA, UFRGS; ANA CAROLINA LINS-E-SILVA, UFRPE; SELVINO NECKEL-OLIVEIRA, UFSC; BRUNO MARTINELLI, UnB; ALBERTO AKAMA, MUSEU PARAENSE EMILIO GOELDI; DOMINGOS RODRIGUES, UFMT; LUIS F. SILVEIRA, USP; ALDICIR OSNI SCARIOT, Cenargen; GERALDO W. FERNANDES, UFMG.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T23:32:01Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-30T23:32:01Z-
dc.date.created2018-11-28
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.other60295
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/1100242-
dc.descriptionThe effects of Brazil's political crisis on science funding necessary for biodiversity conservation are likely to be global. Brazil is not only the world?s most biodiverse nation, it is responsible for the greater part of the Amazon forest, which regulates the climate and provides rain to much of southern South America. Brazil was a world leader in satellite monitoring of land-use change, in-situ biodiversity monitoring, reduction in tropical-forest deforestation, protection of indigenous lands, and a model for other developing nations. Coordinated public responses will be necessary to prevent special-interest groups from using the political crisis to weaken science funding, environmental legislation and law enforcement.
dc.description.uribitstream/item/187428/1/Magnusson-Effects-of-Brazil.pdfpt_BR
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherFrontiers in Ecology and Evolution, v. 6, n. 163, p. 1-6, oct. 2018.
dc.relation.ispartofEmbrapa Pantanal - Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
dc.titleEffects of Brazil's political crisis on the science needed for biodiversity conservation.
dc.typeArtigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
dc.date.updated2018-11-30T23:32:01Zpt_BR
dc.subject.thesagroFinanciamento
dc.subject.thesagroPesquisa
dc.subject.thesagroBiodiversidade
dc.subject.nalthesaurusFunding
dc.subject.nalthesaurusBiodiversity
dc.subject.nalthesaurusResearch
dc.ainfo.id1100242
dc.ainfo.lastupdate2018-11-30
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2018.00163
Appears in Collections:Artigo em periódico indexado (CPAP)

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