Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/1091667
Research center of Embrapa/Collection: Embrapa Amazônia Oriental - Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
Date Issued: 2018
Type of Material: Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
Authors: OLVEIRA, P. E. S.
ACEVEDO, O. C.
SÖRGEL, M.
TSOKANKUNKU, A.
WOLFF, S.
ARAUJO, A. C. de
SOUZA, R. A. F.
SÁ, M. O.
MANZI, A. O.
ANDREAE, M. O.
Additional Information: Pablo E. S. Oliveira, UFSM; Otávio C. Acevedo, UFSM; Matthias Sörgel, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry; Anywhere Tsokankunku, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry; Stefan Wolff, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry; ALESSANDRO CARIOCA DE ARAUJO, CPATU; Rodrigo A. F. Souza, UEA; Marta O. Sá, INPA; Antônio O. Manzi, INPA; Meinrat O. Andreae, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry.
Title: Nighttime wind and scalar variability within and above an Amazonian canopy.
Publisher: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, v. 18, n. 5, p. 3083-3099, 2018.
Language: en
Keywords: Energia cinética turbulenta
TKE
Description: Nocturnal turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and fluxes of energy, CO2 and O3 between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere are evaluated for a 20-day campaign at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) site. The distinction of these quantities between fully turbulent (weakly stable) and intermittent (very stable) nights is discussed. Spectral analysis indicates that low-frequency, nonturbulent fluctuations are responsible for a large portion of the variability observed on intermittent nights. In these conditions, the low-frequency exchange may dominate over the turbulent transfer. In particular, we show that within the canopy most of the exchange of CO2 and H2O happens on temporal scales longer than 100 s. At 80 m, on the other hand, the turbulent fluxes are almost absent in such very stable conditions, suggesting a boundary layer shallower than 80 m. The relationship between TKE and mean winds shows that the stable boundary layer switches from the very stable to the weakly stable regime during intermittent bursts of turbulence. In general, fluxes estimated with long temporal windows that account for low-frequency effects are more dependent on the stability over a deeper layer above the forest than they are on the stability between the top of the canopy and its interior, suggesting that low-frequency processes are controlled over a deeper layer above the forest.
Thesagro: Dióxido de Carbono
Vento
NAL Thesaurus: Amazonia
Data Created: 2018-05-18
Appears in Collections:Artigo em periódico indexado (CPATU)

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