Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/1132719
Research center of Embrapa/Collection: Embrapa Trigo - Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
Date Issued: 2021
Type of Material: Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE)
Authors: MÜLLER, M.
SCHNEIDER, J. R.
KLEIN, V. A.
SILVA, E. da
SILVA JUNIOR, J. P. da
SOUZA, A. M.
CHAVARRIA, G.
Additional Information: MARIELE MÜLLER, 1 Agronomy Post-Graduate Program, Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, Brazil, 2; JULIA RENATA SCHNEIDER, 1 Agronomy Post-Graduate Program, Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, Brazil, 2; VILSON ANTÔNIO KLEIN, Agronomy Post-Graduate Program, Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, Brazil; ELIARDO DA SILVA, Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, Brazil, 3 Embrapa Wheat, Passo Fundo, Brazil, 4; JOSE PEREIRA DA SILVA JUNIOR, CNPT; ADRIANO MENDONÇA SOUZA, Department of Statistics, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Brazil; GERALDO CHAVARRIA, Agronomy Post-Graduate Program, Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, Brazi.
Title: Soybean root growth in response to chemical, physical, and biological soil variations.
Publisher: Frontiers in Plant Science, v. 12, article 602569, Feb. 2021.
Language: Ingles
Keywords: Root volume
Glycine max Merril
Soil nutrition
Soil porosity
Principal component analyses
Description: Environmental conditions affect crop yield, and water deficit has been highlighted by the negative impact on soybean grain production. Radicial growth in greater volume and depth can be an alternative to minimize losses caused by a lack of water. Therefore, knowledge of how soybean roots behave before the chemical, physical, and biological attributes of the soil can help establish managements that benefit in-depth root growth. The objective was to evaluate the growth of soybean roots in response to chemical, physical, and biological variations in the soil, in different soil locations and depths. Six experiments were conducted in different locations. Soil samples were collected every 5 cm of soil up to 60 cm of soil depth for chemical, physical, and biological analysis. The roots were collected every 5 cm deep up to 45 cm deep from the ground. The six sites presented unsatisfactory values of pH and organic matter, and resented phosphorus, potassium, and calcium at high concentrations in the first centimeters of soil depth. The total porosity of the soil was above 0.50 m3 m−3 , but the proportion of the volume of macropores, micropores, and cryptopores resulted in soils with resistance to penetration to the roots. Microbial biomass was higher on the soil surface when compared to deeper soil layers, however, the metabolic quotient was higher in soil depth, showing that microorganisms in depth have low ability to incorporate carbon into microbial biomass. Root growth occurred in a greater proportion in the first centimeters of soil-depth, possibly because the soil attributes that favor the root growth is concentrated on the soil surface.
Data Created: 2021-07-01
Appears in Collections:Artigo em periódico indexado (CNPT)

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